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May 17, 2017

Protect your nonprofit from cyber attacks

WannaCry compromises over 200,000 computers

There’s a new wave of ransomware sweeping the globe. Last week, more than 200,000 computers were infected in 150 countries by the WannaCry Decryptor, which encrypts users’ files while the attackers extort money to unlock them.

Many nonprofits don’t realize they’re vulnerable until it’s too late. In fact, nonprofits are often at greater risk:

  • Nonprofits typically lack IT and IT security knowledge.
  • Nonprofits tend to have fewer IT-related staffing resources.
  • Hackers can steal as much information from 10 small nonprofits as they can from one large business.

We are discounting our Intro to IT Security course, which starts next week, to help more nonprofits gain access to the tools and skills they need to protect themselves from cyber attacks like WannaCry. Leon Wilson, a nonprofit IT security expert with more than 20 years of experience, will share resources and practical tips on how you can protect yourself and your organization.

Use the discount code protect and get a 25% discount. Sign up today and make sure your nonprofit is prepared.

Still can’t afford it? Contact us at training@nten.org and tell us a bit about your work and why you want to take this course.

James Sigala
James has a passion for understanding the connection between people, and technology systems. He’s dedicated to helping nonprofits leverage technology for training, professional development and expanding organization capacity. He is excited to be working with NTEN at the intersection of technology and education. James earned a Bachelor of Science from Portland State University, in Social Science with a focus in behavioral psychology. He has worked in areas of medical technology, content management, multimedia production, and technical training. Since joining NTEN, James has contributed to developing the Nonprofit Technology Professional Certificate, taking NTEN's education program from webinars to a blended learning curriculum. Although James is not from Oregon, he considers Portland home. After hours, he enjoys camping, hiking, studying philosophy, foodie happy hours, tinkering with tech, and science fiction.