Tag: peer-to-peer fundraising

Auctions can excite donors and raise funds fast, and that makes them an ideal way to engage your base of support while hitting your fundraising goals.

Experienced fundraisers know that collecting key fundraising metrics is a valuable part of any fundraising event. When collected during a fundraising auction, this data can help guide your organization’s future events and greatly refine your understanding of your donor base.

With smart planning and some adaptive digital tools, you can host an online or live charity auction for any level of donor. Thoughtfully planning your auction and considering your exact goals well ahead of time will ensure a successful event that boosts engagement and raises funds.

1. Use targeting in your auction strategy

Segmenting your donor base is never a bad idea. In fact, it’s the first step in targeting your auction strategy.

Depending on the kind of auction you want to host and the level of donor you’d like to engage, you need to consider your organization’s options and tools for organizing and directing the event. For instance:

  • Major donors are more likely to enjoy live auction events. Simplify the entire experience by providing digital tools for mobile bidding.
  • Mid-level donors and members will enjoy live and digital fundraising auction events that foster a sense of community and have lower stakes.
  • Your entire donor base will enjoy online charity auction events, with extended timeframes and a reduced sense of competition.

It’s always important to speak your donors’ language, which includes understanding and anticipating their expectations of any given fundraising event.

The takeaway: Digital auction and bidding tools help you target your charity auction to specific segments of your donor base, increasing engagement and ensuring a successful auction.

2. Tailor your catalog to specific donor levels

Once you’ve thoughtfully adjusted your event strategy and digital toolkit, it’s important that you do the same with your catalog of auction items. Consider these questions:

  • Who are your intended donors for this auction? Just one segment or everyone?
  • Will this charity auction event be live or hosted online?
  • What initially drew your supporters to your organization?
  • What are the goals of your campaign and of this specific event?

Consciously tailoring your catalog to your specific campaign and intended donors ensures your event will be relevant to the interests of those you want to engage. For instance, a high-profile auction might offer items in a higher price range since attendees will be more excited for some friendly competition.

In contrast, auction items for a local school fundraiser need to be suited to a wide range of donor levels. Including some raffle items and events within a more traditional auction would be a great strategy to address this need, and this is why it’s important to invest in versatile school auction software or other tools that can adapt to your needs.

For online auctions, offering items with starting bids higher than your average online donation is the quickest way to lose your donors’ interest.

The takeaway: Offer items that your intended donors will want and can also easily afford. Otherwise, you could alienate your broader donor base or waste your major donors’ interest.

3. Use integrated event software to plan your auction

Using a comprehensive event planning software can make the entire planning process considerably more efficient, saving you time and resources.

For a charity auction of any size, live or online, it’s important that you be able to compile and access information quickly. Keep the entire event running smoothly with functions like:

  • Event website hosting, registration tools, and check-in functions
  • Automated invitation emails and mailing lists
  • Ability to store and process payment and shipping information
  • Online and mobile bidding support

Not only will a strong event management software solution prevent any logistical hiccups in your auction, it’ll also provide you with important analytic reporting that will be invaluable to your future campaigns.

The takeaway: Find event management software that will support online and mobile auctions as well as integrate and process all your data.

4. Consider the broader context of your fundraising campaign

Is your charity auction a standalone fundraising event, or is it part of a broader fundraising campaign?

A larger standalone charity auction is a major fundraising event in and of itself and should be marketed as such. Online auctions and mobile bidding, while also unique events, are a perfect element to configure into your broader social fundraising campaigns.

Think of your different fundraising strategies and the ways that online auction events might be integrated into them:

  • Augment your peer-to-peer fundraising campaign. Peer-to-peer fundraising pages can provide donors with information on your online auction.
  • Offer special promotions from your sponsors. If your organization is supported by local businesses, offer special discounts or service packages in a special online auction.
  • Use online auctions to promote other fundraising events. For instance, if you’ll be hosting a charity golf tournament, let participants bid on mulligans!
  • Online and mobile bidding tools have made it cheaper and easier to incorporate auction elements into other fundraising strategies, which will boost your overall campaign strategies.

The takeaway: If your overarching campaign involves other digital outlets or fundraising events, brainstorm some ways that an online auction could contribute to overall donor engagement.

5. Promote your auction through targeted outlets

Marketing is an essential part of any successful fundraising event, and it’s crucial to spread the word through channels relevant to your supporters.

Here are some targeted methods that you might use to promote your auction event:

  • A social media campaign to spread awareness among all your followers
  • An email campaign to more specific segments of donors
  • Special promotions or printed material at your other fundraising events
  • A direct mail campaign to all your members

A social media blast would be perfect for a broad online auction event, while targeted email, direct mail, or phone calls might work best for a live charity auction for your more major donors.

Additionally, create a dedicated microsite for your live or online auction events through your event management software or online auction platform. This is the best place to direct supporters for more information and to tease some special items from the auction catalog.

The takeaway: Depending on the type of donors that you’re hoping to engage with your auction event, you should specifically target your marketing strategies to best catch their attention.

As with any fundraising event, it’s important to put as much planning and forethought into your charity auctions and online auction events as possible. This ensures that both your donors and your organization will get something of value from the event.

By targeting and tailoring every aspect of your event to maximize its relevance and appeal to your supporters, you’ll be sure to host a successful auction and reach your fundraising goals.

Social fundraising is the act of getting people (supporters, donors, evangelists, fundraisers) to post to their personal networks about the actions they take related to your cause. It’s about getting the most out of what you’re already doing. Harnessing the value of social fundraising can be a powerful tool to meet next-level fundraising.

Shares have real value

Some will say that there isn’t any inherent value in social shares and that they don’t think that a share does anything for their cause or mission. However, your supporters have personal networks that are difficult to reach on your own, and growing your own list is expensive and hard.

For example, if you were trying to grow your list by 10,000 supporters, how many of the following would you have to do? Dinners, events, print ads, direct mail, Facebook ads? Do you have the capacity, resources, and budget to do all of these? Are they all effective? Do they tap into an engaged community?

By encouraging your supporters to share the actions they’ve taken with your organization (such as a donation, a ticket purchase to an event, or a personal experience), you are tapping into an otherwise seemingly unreachable network—one that is invested in the life of their friend or family member who is sharing their action. Social shares create authenticity about the subject that intrigues others to dig in and take further action of their own.

For organizations whose mission involves public awareness, social sharing can increase general awareness and connect your organization’s work with people who may need your help or want to learn more.

Social shares can bring in new donors from grassroots to high wealth—nearly everyone has a social media presence. They can also lead to new volunteers, new peer-to-peer fundraisers, new corporate partners, and even new grants.

Can you calculate the actual value?

The average Facebook user has 155 friends. If you wanted to reach 10,000 new people about your cause, how many average Facebook supporters would you need to just share their action with your cause? The answer is 65. Having just 65 supporters share with their Facebook community leads to over 10,000 connections that you otherwise wouldn’t have had. Sounds much more effective than trying to gain 10,000 new connections without social fundraising.

Often a supporter can’t donate right away, but they could still lend their voice and share. According to our internal data, when donors share news about their donation, it results in a new donation about 20% of the time.

Let’s look at some numbers regarding the average donation value by type of share

  • $13 when a supporter shares an online campaign page
    $23 when a donor shares their donation
    $63 when a campaign organizer shares their campaign

And there’s really no reason to rethink your current events, campaigns, or spend additional marketing dollars. Social fundraising can be layered onto everything you’re already doing. You can bring in fundraising efforts that you’ve traditionally done offline (ticket registration for example) allowing your network the ability to not only purchase tickets for your event, but to share that they are supporting your cause as well. This action can lead to more ticket sales and awareness for your event. Additionally, making sure that your supporters know that their share brings value increases the likelihood that they’ll do it. Keeping this as part of your narrative helps to spread the message that shares hold value for the organization (and mission) your donors care about.

Shares do add real value to digital fundraising. When your organization taps into the power of social fundraising, encouraging supporters to share each action they take with your cause, those shares spread in an authentic way, leading to more awareness, supporters, and donations.

#GivingTuesday takes place on November 28th this year and wise nonprofits are already planning strategies to leverage this massive day of giving. This year, six key factors are conspiring to make this the perfect year for peer-to-peer fundraising (the act of your supporters asking their own community for donations on your behalf) to be a powerful addition for your nonprofit’s strategy.

Here’s why:

1. #GivingTuesday has significant brand recognition

In the short span since the idea was hatched in 2012, #GivingTuesday has become the de facto start to the end-of-year giving season. This reality is driven not just by the recognition of the day within the nonprofit community but within society more generally. With more and more folks familiar with the idea of #GivingTuesday, it’s easier for your supporters to seek donations from their friends and family as part of that day.

2. Nonprofits need to broaden their reach on #GivingTuesday

It’s one thing to preach to the choir on #GivingTuesday. It’s quite another to add members to that choir. Most nonprofits have effective end-of-year appeals that activate existing supporters with or without #GivingTuesday. What they are hungry for is a way to broaden their supporter base. Peer-to-peer fundraising strategies around #GivingTuesday fit nicely into that goal.

3. Donor fatigue this end-of-year season puts a premium on social proof

There was a deluge in donations at the end of 2016. Many were in response to the results of the presidential election and, as we approach one year past that election, donor fatigue during this upcoming end-of-year giving season will likely be high. Leveraging your supporters to advocate on your behalf will be a powerful form of social proof that can help overcome potential donor malaise.

4. Nonprofits are starting #GivingTuesday appeals earlier

As the profile of #GivingTuesday has risen, nonprofits have responded by creating and executing plans earlier and earlier in the year. No longer are they simply tweeting a couple of times with the #GivingTuesday hashtag on the day itself and calling it good. This advanced planning is perfectly in line with the requirements for mobilizing existing supporters, allowing for the time needed to recruit and inform ambassadors for your cause.

5. Increased options and decreased cost for peer-to-peer platforms

Once the province of just a couple of providers charging significant fees, peer-to-peer fundraising platforms have grown in number and shrunk in cost, making them more accessible to nonprofits of various sizes and budgets.

6. Integrations with peer-to-peer platforms are better

Peer-to-peer fundraising solutions are about leveraging and expanding relationships. As such, they cry out for tight integrations with constituent relationship management (CRM) solutions like Salesforce. As peer-to-peer options have multiplied, they have also matured and added integrations with CRMs that multiple the effect of your supporters’ efforts while minimizing paper-pushing on your end.

With a little strategic planning, you can leverage peer-to-peer fundraising to meet not only your #GivingTuesday goals, but to reach new supporters and increase your year-end giving overall.

We are all looking for ways to save money and to use our (often) limited resources to most effectively serve our mission. We often find that our mission doesn’t wait for the technology resources we use to catch up to the innovative ideas that we fundraisers have, so we come up with these ad hoc solutions. The next thing you know, you have more fundraising platforms and vendors than you know what to do with because there isn’t one platform that does everything well. Then you look at your expenses and go “ugh.”

The following is not an endorsement or a knock against any of the platforms mentioned: each one has served a need. Rather, it’s to share with you a case study of sorts: the changes we have made and continue to make to keep up with the evolving needs of our events, our participants, and our donors.

Where we started

When I came to Covenant House in 2013, our peer-to-peer fundraising program was still very new. We had only been doing peer-to-peer fundraising events for two years and we were growing at a sometimes intimidatingly fast rate.

Because each of our peer-to-peer and event initiatives has a specific set of technology needs and there were no event staff with technical expertise, we were using three different fundraising platforms. Two of these were one-stop shops, First Giving and Event Journal, which required very little work from staff but were limited in what they could provide in customized reporting. The third fundraising platform, Blackbaud’s TeamRaiser, was managed by one staff member and a vendor, because the customizations were seemingly endless.

Then, we decided to revamp our DIY program and needed a more robust platform that allowed for customization and provided more complex reporting, so we partnered with DonorDrive. Then we were required to use a specific fundraising platform (Crowdrise) by our charity endurance partner and all of a sudden we had 5 fundraising platforms, leading to more expense and more duplication of work.

How we consolidated our fundraising platforms

Our program was (and is still) growing and so is our team. We now have several people on our team with various levels of technical knowledge. We took the time to look at our programs, our expenses, and our staff knowledge in the context of trying to get our communications and digital properties to look like they are all part of the same family.

After many conversations and frustrations regarding the lack of customized reporting for our charity endurance program, we decided that we could create an affiliate site on DonorDrive. We also recently learned that we are no longer required to use Crowdrise, allowing us to consolidate the program’s tech needs.

The big win came with the evaluation of alternatives for Event Journal. The event and its technology needs have changed over the past couple of years, so we were keeping our eyes open for a platform that could provide more robust reporting as well as assist in overall project management. We were introduced to Greater Giving and after several demos and more conversations, we decided to move forward to transition our traditional events. We are still in the early stages of this transition, but it has already allowed for more customization, includes features for which we previously had to use additional software, and has provided more resources.

What’s next for our organization

All of these changes added up to $15,000 in savings, noted within one fiscal quarter for the organization. It also made it easier to ensure our digital event fundraising platforms have consistent messaging and branding to best promote our mission.

We continue to evaluate our platforms and related costs and we like to learn about new products. It’s good to know what is out there. It may not meet a need right now, but with the ever-evolving landscape nonprofit fundraising, one never knows.
How do you decide which platforms to keep or how many to use? What are your tech wins and challenges? Join the discussion and share your experience!

(This article was originally published on Nonprofit Tech for Good and is reprinted here with permission.)

Currently only nonprofits in the United States can take advantage of Facebook Fundraisers. This is frustrating to many NGOs, charities, and nonprofits located outside of the United States, but it’s due to the fact that the United States has a database of nonprofits called GuideStar USA that Facebook can sync with theirs to easily verify a nonprofit’s legal status. Facebook is likely working on expanding their fundraising tools to the United Kingdom and Canada where other such databases exist and eventually (hopefully, finally) a similar database will exist on a global scale (perhaps the BRIDGE Registry or the OnGood Global NGO Directory).

All that said, any Facebook user can now create Facebook Fundraisers for nonprofits listed in the GuideStar/Facebook database which currently numbers around 750,000. For details about Facebook Fundraising Tools and for information about how donations are distributed to your nonprofit, please see: nonprofits.fb.com/topic/fundraising-tools.

Facebook currently has 1.94 billion monthly users. Empowering your supporters to fundraise for your nonprofit inside an online community where they already connected to their friends and family is smart strategy. At the very least, the tools are worth experimenting with.

1. Verify your nonprofit is in the Facebook Fundraiser database.

Go to facebook.com/fundraisers and search for your nonprofit. If listed, your supporters can create Facebook Fundraisers for your nonprofit. Sign up for Facebook’s Fundraising Tools if you want access to daily fundraising reports.

2. Update your Facebook Page Cover Photo.

Your cover photo will be the default photo for the Facebook Fundraisers created by your supporters.

3. Create a “Day of Giving” Facebook Event.

Give your nonprofit four to six weeks to promote your Facebook “Day of Giving” campaign. In the Facebook Event, list the ways that your Facebook Followers can give to you on this day and how they can create a Facebook Fundraiser for your campaign. Then, post your event to Facebook and pin it to the top of your page.

4. Promote your Facebook Event on your website, in your email campaigns, and on social media.

The Humane Society of the United States is an organization regularly in the habit of early adoption of new social media tools and trends. They created a landing page on their website for their “Day of Giving” campaign that is easy to promote online. Study and learn from HSUS: humanesociety.org/dayofgiving

5. Thank your Facebook Fundraisers and donors.

You can’t post a “Thank you” comment as your page on Facebook Fundraisers. If you have a staff person willing to use their personal profile, then your fundraisers would appreciate the acknowledgement. You could also post a link in your Facebook Event where they could sign up for an email list so you can thank and engage them via email. Also, if your nonprofit has signed up for Facebook Fundraising Tools, in daily transaction reports you will receive the email addresses of your donors if they have opt-ed in. Create a system to email and thank them immediately!

As we enter into the biggest fundraising time of the year, I’m reminded that community is more important than ever in reaching new audiences and meeting fundraising goals. Many of you are looking for ways to gain exposure, and cultivating a vibrant community is the answer to that. Read more from our step-by-step guide.

If you were a fly on the wall in any large brand’s boardroom, you’d hear the word “community” at least a dozen times. Fostering a community is high on the list of priorities of many top-level executives today because it builds a loyal customer base.

As a nonprofit, it should rank high on your list too, because the stronger your community is, the more trust they’ll have in your nonprofit. And the more trust they have, the more they’ll want to donate to see your cause flourish, or even better, become fundraisers through peer-to-peer fundraising.

Therefore, fostering and growing a loyal community for your nonprofit is key to your fundraising success. So, what exactly is a community, and how do you get the most out of it?

What Is a Community?

A few years ago, that word probably brought to mind a small social group who all share government and a common geographical location. However, with the rise of that great thing called the Internet, “community” has taken on a whole new meaning.

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Today, most discussions of community refer to an online community—a group of people that shares common interests and that uses the Internet to communicate. Of course, these people probably communicate about causes they’re passionate about in person, as well, but the online statistics are much easier for nonprofits to gather and measure.

Shower Strike, a crowdfunding campaign for clean water, includes the hashtag #showerstrike in their social media posts. Shower Strike supporters and followers also use the hashtag in their posts, which helps drive easier discovery on social media and more brand awareness.

Shower Strike has cultivated a great relationship with their supporters, to the point where supporters post about their cause and urge others to join in by raising funds and going on their own shower strike.

You, too, can foster an engaged and flourishing fundraising community around your own cause.

Not sure where to start? Let’s jump right in!

Understanding Your Community

Before you can successfully figure out how to connect with or grow your existing community, you first need to understand what makes them tick. What resonates with them? What doesn’t? What methods are they using to communicate? What are some of their problems or challenges?

Gaining insight into the inner workings of your community can seem complex and overwhelming, but there are a few different tactics you can use to get some insider knowledge.

  1. Research

Step one should include rolling up your sleeves and doing some good old-fashioned digging to find out more about your audience. Check out your Google Analytics and social media insights to discover their online behaviors. Look back through their old conversations related to your community to find out what they’re saying. Throw out a few different “test balloons” to see what performs well with them.

Put on your detective hat and see what information you can hunt down!

  1. Listen and Observe

In order to cultivate a booming community, you need to be constantly monitoring all related conversations and posts. Use social media tracking tools that will notify you when someone has posted about one of your selected keywords or handles. Set up Google Alerts so that you can easily collect important blog posts, videos, and news articles.

Just being alerted when someone uses your hashtag could help you keep tabs on how awareness is spreading and who’s included in your community. When Project Aware’s hashtag was used, they were able to see the traction they were gaining in the diving community.

Perhaps most importantly, always take feedback (and even those hard-to-hear criticisms) from your supporters for consideration. Respond in a timely manner to let them know they’ve been heard.

  1. Inquire

Of course, if you have specific questions for your community, feel free to ask them. Whether you inquire about how you could be telling your story better or how frequently they’d like to hear from you, that insight from your target audience is incredibly valuable information.

There are tons of different tools and platforms you can use to talk with your community, including social media, email newsletters, and surveys. Get out there and ask them all of your burning questions! Your engaged community members will be happy to answer.

Tools to Connect with Your Community

Once you’ve gained some insight into the nitty gritty of your community, it’s time to put your new knowledge to good use in order to start effectively connecting with them and moving them up the engagement ladder.

What exactly does it mean to “connect” with your community? As consumers, we don’t want advertising anymore. We want conversation. We don’t want megaphones and billboards. We want relationships.

You’re probably familiar with many of the platforms you can utilize in order to form lasting relationships with your community members. But perhaps you aren’t using them as best you could. We’ve broken down some ways to use each of the common methods below.

Email

  • Create a 3-part welcome series for new supporters: each email should provide new information or content, ending with a low-lift action
  • Segment your email list into fundraisers, donors, non-donors, recurring donors, those who have taken other actions, etc., and target content specifically to them
  • Incentivize donors to become fundraisers by offering to send them exclusive updates and opportunities
  • Craft a survey asking how people would like to engage with you via email and online
  • Put all subscribers who respond to your emails or send you emails into their own group for follow-up and continued engagement

Social Media

  • Make use of lists, filters, and streams in Twitter management tools to monitor and engage with more active supporters (those who RT you, mention you, and answer your questions)
  • Provide opportunities for engaged social media supporters to be “ambassadors” for your cause, to share content, recruit others, and take action
  • Look for quick and easy ways to collect information and feedback from your social community—one-question surveys, polls, votes, etc.
  • Recognize donors and fundraisers by tweeting them thank yous, and retweeting them!

Website

  • After taking an action like donating or signing a petition, a thank you or follow-up page should provide more information and a next step
  • Strategically place share buttons, donation widgets, email sign-ups, etc. in and around content where it makes sense for a user to take action
  • Consider if blog comments and discussion boards are right for your site, depending on the engagement you want
  • Provide exclusive opportunities and content on your website for those who “unlock” certain sections by sharing, viewing, or commenting

Events

  • Find out if any of your community members live close to your geographical area, and set up an event to meet and get to know one another
  • Inform your community of any in-person volunteering opportunities they can help out with, strengthening their connection to your cause

Growing Your Community

Of course, your existing fundraising community is fantastic. But, as a nonprofit, you’re always looking for ways to grow, evolve, and expand your reach. Obviously you don’t want the size of your community to stagnate.

One of your goals should be to continuously grow and nurture your fundraising community. Establishing your existing audience was challenging enough, and finding ways to add to that pool of people can seem impossible. Have no fear! Here are a few tips and tools you can employ to constantly expand your community.

  1. Strong Foundation

It’s hard to convince people that they should care about your mission if you have no idea how to even explain it to them. Before attempting to grow your community, you need to have a solid foundation to build on. Take some time to get your ducks in a row.

Make sure you have a functioning website in place. Confirm that you have someone on staff that can address concerns and questions. And definitely ensure that you can eloquently—and briefly—explain your mission and background. Think of it as crafting the perfect “elevator pitch” for your nonprofit!

  1. Events and Outreach

Events are not only great for connecting with your current community, but also for attracting new supporters and potential community members.

The Gauntlet, a crowdfunding campaign by Mox Boarding House, created a Facebook page to engage a core group of advocates within their community.

Mox Boarding House decided to do a fundraising event where different teams would compete in various board games, with one winner ultimately taking “the gauntlet” home. They decided that, after teams raised a certain amount of funds, they would get various advantages in the games.

This was a great way of incentivizing a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign while also creating an event that catered to the interests of their community.

Through the community that Mox Boarding House built, they were able to surpass their fundraising goal of $30,000—by more than 3 times. This powerhouse community was able to raise $92,088 to feed families in need.

Pinpointing the event that would most interest your community will help get old and new supporters invested in your campaign, and utilizing peer-to-peer fundraising is a great way to expand your reach. Engaging your supporters to fundraise on your behalf will help them feel they are making a difference beyond just donating.

Ask your existing members to do some outreach of their own and bring new people to your events and meet-ups. Join a local association and attend their get-togethers in order to network with new people. You can wait for people to find you—or, you can be proactive and find them yourself.

  1. Powerful Content

Remember the phenomenon of KONY 2012, Invisible Children’s effort to raise awareness of war criminal Joseph Kony? The cause absolutely exploded on social media.

What made this so organically shareable? Quite simply, it was an incredibly powerful story. Nothing’s stopping you from creating powerful content of your own. So share some wonderful narratives from your own nonprofit. Ask supporters how your cause has touched them. Start gathering sound bites and quotes to put together some amazing, shareable content of your own.

  1. Provide a Toolkit

One of the best ways to get your supporters to be advocates for your cause, and thereby gather new supporters, is to provide a toolkit loaded with branded content for your supporters to both inform themselves and share.

In this toolkit, you’ll want to provide a variety of items such as:

  • Campaign One-Sheet
  • Images and Logos
  • Social Media Tips
  • Sample Emails, Press Releases, and Letters
  • Printable Promotional Materials
  • Recognition Tools
  • Fundraising Tips

By equipping your supporters, you create leaders that can recruit more people to support your cause. Additionally, since you are providing the materials, you know that your mission is being conveyed the way you want it to be expressed.

5.  Have A Clear Call To Action

Imagine you’re someone new to your organization: your friend sent you a link to a campaign or website and you click on it. Can you tell, very clearly, what your organization wants them to do? Should they volunteer? Sign up to be a fundraiser? Spread awareness on social media? Come to an event? Donate? Clarifying what the next step for your supporters drives action.

Once you know what you want the bulk of your community to do, don’t be afraid to ask. Take this example from Neverthirst’s Facebook, after they set up their WOD for Water campaign’s mission in previous posts:

Even if you weren’t familiar with Neverthirst’s mission to provide clean water to those without access to it, their call to action is unmistakably clear and compelling: give now and have double the impact.

Here’s a few tips on how to create a compelling call to action:

  • Summarize: Provide a brief, one sentence summary of the online fundraising campaign itself
  • Use Powerful Action Language: Instead of suggesting they donate, be sure to convey the impact of their donation and use action words such as “Donate” “Help” “Share” “Volunteer”
  • Create A Sense Of Urgency: Using “Donate Now” language and referencing the time-sensitiveness of your efforts will move people to take immediate action (e.g., “Donate now to provide school supplies to kids in need so they’ll be ready to learn by Sept 1st!”)

Cultivating your community can undoubtedly be a challenge. After all, it’s about nurturing human relationships—not just upping the numbers on your email subscriber list. The task can seem daunting and intimidating, but it doesn’t need to be insurmountable. Put these tips to work and start growing a community that’s ready to make a difference!

P.S.: Looking for ways to transition your GivingTuesday campaign into year-end giving? Check out our guide here.

If you were a fly on the wall in any large brand’s boardroom, you’d hear the word “community” at least a dozen times. Fostering a community is high on the list of priorities of many top-level executives today because it builds a loyal customer base.

As a nonprofit, it should rank high on your list too, because the stronger your community is, the more trust they’ll have in your nonprofit. And the more trust they have, the more they’ll want to donate to see your cause flourish, or even better, become fundraisers through peer-to-peer fundraising.

Therefore, fostering and growing a loyal community for your nonprofit is key to your fundraising success. So, what exactly is a community, and how do you get the most out of it?

What Is a Community?

A few years ago, that word probably brought to mind a small social group who all share government and a common geographical location. However, with the rise of that great thing called the Internet, “community” has taken on a whole new meaning.

Get more tips! Subscribe to Connect Monthly to receive more content like this in your inbox.

Subscribe

Today, most discussions of community refer to an online community—a group of people that shares common interests and that uses the Internet to communicate. Of course, these people probably communicate about causes they’re passionate about in person, as well, but the online statistics are much easier for nonprofits to gather and measure.

Shower Strike, a crowdfunding campaign for clean water, includes the hashtag #showerstrike in their social media posts. Shower Strike supporters and followers also use the hashtag in their posts, which helps drive easier discovery on social media and more brand awareness.

Shower Strike has cultivated a great relationship with their supporters, to the point where supporters post about their cause and urge others to join in by raising funds and going on their own shower strike.

You, too, can foster an engaged and flourishing fundraising community around your own cause.

Not sure where to start? Let’s jump right in!

Understanding Your Community

Before you can successfully figure out how to connect with or grow your existing community, you first need to understand what makes them tick. What resonates with them? What doesn’t? What methods are they using to communicate? What are some of their problems or challenges?

Gaining insight into the inner workings of your community can seem complex and overwhelming, but there are a few different tactics you can use to get some insider knowledge.

  1. Research

Step one should include rolling up your sleeves and doing some good old-fashioned digging to find out more about your audience. Check out your Google Analytics and social media insights to discover their online behaviors. Look back through their old conversations related to your community to find out what they’re saying. Throw out a few different “test balloons” to see what performs well with them.

Put on your detective hat and see what information you can hunt down!

  1. Listen and Observe

In order to cultivate a booming community, you need to be constantly monitoring all related conversations and posts. Use social media tracking tools that will notify you when someone has posted about one of your selected keywords or handles. Set up Google Alerts so that you can easily collect important blog posts, videos, and news articles.

Just being alerted when someone uses your hashtag could help you keep tabs on how awareness is spreading and who’s included in your community. When Project Aware’s hashtag was used, they were able to see the traction they were gaining in the diving community.

Perhaps most importantly, always take feedback (and even those hard-to-hear criticisms) from your supporters for consideration. Respond in a timely manner to let them know they’ve been heard.

  1. Inquire

Of course, if you have specific questions for your community, feel free to ask them. Whether you inquire about how you could be telling your story better or how frequently they’d like to hear from you, that insight from your target audience is incredibly valuable information.

There are tons of different tools and platforms you can use to talk with your community, including social media, email newsletters, and surveys. Get out there and ask them all of your burning questions! Your engaged community members will be happy to answer.

Tools to Connect with Your Community

Once you’ve gained some insight into the nitty gritty of your community, it’s time to put your new knowledge to good use in order to start effectively connecting with them and moving them up the engagement ladder.

What exactly does it mean to “connect” with your community? As consumers, we don’t want advertising anymore. We want conversation. We don’t want megaphones and billboards. We want relationships.

You’re probably familiar with many of the platforms you can utilize in order to form lasting relationships with your community members. But perhaps you aren’t using them as best you could. We’ve broken down some ways to use each of the common methods below.

Email

  • Create a 3-part welcome series for new supporters: each email should provide new information or content, ending with a low-lift action
  • Segment your email list into fundraisers, donors, non-donors, recurring donors, those who have taken other actions, etc., and target content specifically to them
  • Incentivize donors to become fundraisers by offering to send them exclusive updates and opportunities
  • Craft a survey asking how people would like to engage with you via email and online
  • Put all subscribers who respond to your emails or send you emails into their own group for follow-up and continued engagement

Social Media

  • Make use of lists, filters, and streams in Twitter management tools to monitor and engage with more active supporters (those who RT you, mention you, and answer your questions)
  • Provide opportunities for engaged social media supporters to be “ambassadors” for your cause, to share content, recruit others, and take action
  • Look for quick and easy ways to collect information and feedback from your social community—one-question surveys, polls, votes, etc.
  • Recognize donors and fundraisers by tweeting them thank yous, and retweeting them!

Website

  • After taking an action like donating or signing a petition, a thank you or follow-up page should provide more information and a next step
  • Strategically place share buttons, donation widgets, email sign-ups, etc. in and around content where it makes sense for a user to take action
  • Consider if blog comments and discussion boards are right for your site, depending on the engagement you want
  • Provide exclusive opportunities and content on your website for those who “unlock” certain sections by sharing, viewing, or commenting

Events

  • Find out if any of your community members live close to your geographical area, and set up an event to meet and get to know one another
  • Inform your community of any in-person volunteering opportunities they can help out with, strengthening their connection to your cause

Growing Your Community

Of course, your existing fundraising community is fantastic. But, as a nonprofit, you’re always looking for ways to grow, evolve, and expand your reach. Obviously you don’t want the size of your community to stagnate.

One of your goals should be to continuously grow and nurture your fundraising community. Establishing your existing audience was challenging enough, and finding ways to add to that pool of people can seem impossible. Have no fear! Here are a few tips and tools you can employ to constantly expand your community.

  1. Strong Foundation

It’s hard to convince people that they should care about your mission if you have no idea how to even explain it to them. Before attempting to grow your community, you need to have a solid foundation to build on. Take some time to get your ducks in a row.

Make sure you have a functioning website in place. Confirm that you have someone on staff that can address concerns and questions. And definitely ensure that you can eloquently—and briefly—explain your mission and background. Think of it as crafting the perfect “elevator pitch” for your nonprofit!

  1. Events and Outreach

Events are not only great for connecting with your current community, but also for attracting new supporters and potential community members.

The Gauntlet, a crowdfunding campaign by Mox Boarding House, created a Facebook page to engage a core group of advocates within their community.

Mox Boarding House decided to do a fundraising event where different teams would compete in various board games, with one winner ultimately taking “the gauntlet” home. They decided that, after teams raised a certain amount of funds, they would get various advantages in the games.

This was a great way of incentivizing a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign while also creating an event that catered to the interests of their community.

Through the community that Mox Boarding House built, they were able to surpass their fundraising goal of $30,000—by more than 3 times. This powerhouse community was able to raise $92,088 to feed families in need.

Pinpointing the event that would most interest your community will help get old and new supporters invested in your campaign, and utilizing peer-to-peer fundraising is a great way to expand your reach. Engaging your supporters to fundraise on your behalf will help them feel they are making a difference beyond just donating.

Ask your existing members to do some outreach of their own and bring new people to your events and meet-ups. Join a local association and attend their get-togethers in order to network with new people. You can wait for people to find you—or, you can be proactive and find them yourself.

  1. Powerful Content

Remember the phenomenon of KONY 2012, Invisible Children’s effort to raise awareness of war criminal Joseph Kony? The cause absolutely exploded on social media.

What made this so organically shareable? Quite simply, it was an incredibly powerful story. Nothing’s stopping you from creating powerful content of your own. So share some wonderful narratives from your own nonprofit. Ask supporters how your cause has touched them. Start gathering sound bites and quotes to put together some amazing, shareable content of your own.

  1. Provide a Toolkit

One of the best ways to get your supporters to be advocates for your cause, and thereby gather new supporters, is to provide a toolkit loaded with branded content for your supporters to both inform themselves and share.

In this toolkit, you’ll want to provide a variety of items such as:

  • Campaign One-Sheet
  • Images and Logos
  • Social Media Tips
  • Sample Emails, Press Releases, and Letters
  • Printable Promotional Materials
  • Recognition Tools
  • Fundraising Tips

By equipping your supporters, you create leaders that can recruit more people to support your cause. Additionally, since you are providing the materials, you know that your mission is being conveyed the way you want it to be expressed.

5.  Have A Clear Call To Action

Imagine you’re someone new to your organization: your friend sent you a link to a campaign or website and you click on it. Can you tell, very clearly, what your organization wants them to do? Should they volunteer? Sign up to be a fundraiser? Spread awareness on social media? Come to an event? Donate? Clarifying what the next step for your supporters drives action.

Once you know what you want the bulk of your community to do, don’t be afraid to ask. Take this example from Neverthirst’s Facebook, after they set up their WOD for Water campaign’s mission in previous posts:

Even if you weren’t familiar with Neverthirst’s mission to provide clean water to those without access to it, their call to action is unmistakably clear and compelling: give now and have double the impact.

Here’s a few tips on how to create a compelling call to action:

  • Summarize: Provide a brief, one sentence summary of the online fundraising campaign itself
  • Use Powerful Action Language: Instead of suggesting they donate, be sure to convey the impact of their donation and use action words such as “Donate” “Help” “Share” “Volunteer”
  • Create A Sense Of Urgency: Using “Donate Now” language and referencing the time-sensitiveness of your efforts will move people to take immediate action (e.g., “Donate now to provide school supplies to kids in need so they’ll be ready to learn by Sept 1st!”)

Cultivating your community can undoubtedly be a challenge. After all, it’s about nurturing human relationships—not just upping the numbers on your email subscriber list. The task can seem daunting and intimidating, but it doesn’t need to be insurmountable. Put these tips to work and start growing a community that’s ready to make a difference!

At CrowdRise, we’ve seen a shift towards the traditional model of giving. In a space that used to be all about the donor, we’re finding that the real key to engaging passionate supporters and raising more money for your cause is all about embracing the individual fundraiser.

A fundraiser is a passionate supporter of your cause. They either have a personal connection or have been touched by your cause in some way that they’re engaged enough to not only give to your organization, but to fundraise and get other​ people to give to your cause.

I like to say that a $25 donor is great, but a $250 fundraiser is a game-changer.

Here’s why…

By focusing on the individual fundraiser, you’re tapping into a network of supporters that otherwise might have never heard of your organization. Think about it. You have a passionate supporter who has been giving to your charity for years and has an obvious personal connection to your cause. If you reach out to them and encourage them to not only be a donor but to become a fundraiser, you’re tapping into an engaged group who will then go out and send messages and social media posts to their entire network of friends and family with a personal message about why your cause means so much to them and how they’d really appreciate it if their supporters would give to their fundraiser. All of a sudden, you’ve taken a passionate person, empowered them to tell their personal story to their friends and family, which in turn gives you exposure and incremental donations. Their love for your cause is easily identifiable and almost impossible to say no to. It’s a real grassroots way to reach out and touch more people and raise way more money for your cause than you ever thought possible.

Who makes good fundraisers?

You’re most likely sitting around a few of them right now. Staff is a great place to start when it comes to fundraisers. They love your cause, are super passionate, and are great at explaining your mission. Encourage each of your staff to set up fundraisers for your cause and reach out to their friends and family both via email and through direct messaging on their social networks.

Many charities forget that their board members are some of the best fundraising assets they have. By reaching out to your entire board and encouraging them to become fundraisers, you have a real opportunity to reach a large and oftentimes lucrative group of donors. Your board members are on your board for a reason. We often tell our users that you should message your board members and basically give them no way out of fundraising. They’re passionate, have great networks, and should want to help.

Whether you have a list of 50 or a list of 50,000, reaching out to the supporters who have taken the time to follow your organization, donate before, and are actively seeking out ways to help your cause is another way to get more fundraisers. Reach out and let them know that you’re looking for passionate individuals to start fundraisers for your cause in order to help spread the word, raise more money, and make a real difference.

What’s the best way to get the movement going?

Make sure to send an email to your entire staff and ask them to start a fundraiser. Explain to them how the impact they have on your cause grows exponentially when they can reach out to their networks. Offer incentives like days off and staff pizza parties to encourage a little competition.

For your board members, it’s a great idea to reach out to each one individually. Make sure to remind them why they’re on your board and what an asset they are to your cause. Explain that, if they start a fundraiser and reach out to their networks, they’ll play a large part in getting your mission out there and bring more donations rolling in.

When it comes to your list, we suggest emailing in small batches—10 people at a time instead of 100 people. You don’t want supporters to feel anonymous, so definitely make it seem like more of a personal ask. Tell them that your cause relies on its best supporters to really reach more people and get more donations to help further your mission. Offer incentives, like charity t-shirts or other items that will encourage your fundraisers to reach their goals.

So, now you have one of your supporters messaging on behalf of your cause, driving awareness, encouraging lots of donations, and introducing new people to your email list. Incredible difference, right?

If you’re one of the 84% of people worldwide who claim they “couldn’t go a day” without a mobile phone in hand … You are not alone! We’ve never been more passionate users of mobile devices than we are right now.

At my company, Artez Interactive, we clearly can see the rising importance of smartphones and tablets by looking at the traffic to fundraising and donation pages on our North American platform. Of the millions of unique visitors to our system every month, over 15% are visiting on mobile devices.

As we increasingly adopt mobile devices in our professional and personal lives, we are also turning to mobile technology to help us support charitable causes.

At Artez, we wanted to know more about the impact of mobile devices on peer-to-peer, or “crowd-sourced,” fundraising campaigns. When individuals are motivated to ask their friends and social networks to donate to a cause, are those supporters using smartphones and tablets to help them fundraise? Similarly, are donors in peer-driven events giving through mobile-web enabled devices?

We examined the fundraising success of 83,566 participants in a variety of peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns to help answer that question for our Mobile Matters Whitepaper.

Some of the individuals in this study were participating in traditional run, walk, or cycle-a-thon events. Others were encouraged to host a party for a cause or raise pledges towards the completion of a challenging activity. All participants were asked to sign up on a charitable organization’s website and collect donations on a personal fundraising page towards their fundraising goal.

Registrants had the choice of any of the following digital fundraising tools to help them raise money:

  • Event Website: Participants on laptops and computers had the option to log into the campaign’s website to send solicitation emails, post on social media sites, upload photos and personal messages, and track donations through an online fundraising console.
  • Mobile Website: Participants on mobile devices automatically experienced a mobile-version of the campaign website, allowing them to log into the site and raise money through a mobile-optimized version of the fundraising console.
  • Mobile App: Participants with an Android or iOS device could download the event’s free mobile application (“app”) from Google Play or the iTunes store. The app allowed participants to log into a version of the campaign’s fundraising console, access their device’s contact list for email, post to social sites, and upload photos taken from their smartphones.

Given these options, we discovered that 23% of all participants chose to log into the mobile web site, download and log into the mobile app, or use both mobile options. (The highest percentage of “mobile fundraisers” we saw in any individual campaign was 37%.) That means that overall, almost one in four registrants used mobile tools to fundraise for their cause.

Mobile fundraisers and fundraising success

In each campaign we examined, mobile fundraisers raised more money than those who used the web only.

Participants who chose to use one mobile tool (mobile web or mobile app) raised 2.2 times more money than non-mobile participants. Individuals who used both mobile web and a mobile app were even more successful, raising 2.95 times more than non-mobile participants. These “heaviest mobile users” represented some of the most successful fundraisers in each campaign.

Do mobile fundraisers simply have wealthier friends? No!

Mobile fundraisers raised more individual pledges from friends and family than non-mobile fundraisers. The online-only group of participants averaged 5.1 individual donations. When participants used one mobile tool, either web or app, they earned an average 8.4 individual donations. Participants who used both mobile web and mobile apps earned even more, on average 11.4 individual donations.

Could mobile fundraisers be more successful at earning more pledges because they are making more asks for donations to friends and family members? When we surveyed participants to see which features of apps they were using the most, the most popular answer was: “make ‘asks’ for donations via email, Facebook and Twitter”.

Why are mobile fundraisers more successful at raising money?

It’s possible that mobile tools themselves help participants raise more money, encouraging them to check their messages and fundraising totals on-the-go, or make more individual requests for donations.

It’s also possible that a campaign’s most engaged, most enthusiastic, and best performing fundraisers are also big fans of smartphones and tablets. Most event fundraising professionals are well aware of the “80/20 Rule” proposing that, in general, 80% of donations will be generated by 20% of the most active participants.

Either scenario suggests it’s important for fundraising campaigns to provide mobile technology options for participants.

Donors and mobile devices

Participant success is only one piece of the mobile picture. Many people think of “mobile donations” as meaning gifts by text-to-donate (SMS), however, with the shift towards mobile web and responsive design, it’s now easier for donors on smartphones and tablets to give by credit card or PayPal directly through a charity’s mobile-optimized donation form.

With mobile traffic to charity and nonprofit pages hovering at 15%, we wondered about the donors in these peer-driven campaigns. Are donors giving on mobile devices?

When we dove into the pool of over 250,000 individual donations, we found that, yes, donors are making pledges on mobile web browsers. A little over 6.5% of the donations were made through a smartphone or tablet browser. To put this number in perspective, only 12 months ago the average number of mobile web donations in a campaign was 2.15%. That’s an incredible increase of 205% in the last year. (Which begs the question — what will the percentage of donations by mobile web browsers be by the end of 2013?)

What’s driving the rapid rise of mobile web donations?

The fact that almost 50% of Americans now own smartphones is just the beginning of the explanation. We also know that the majority of tweets are read on a mobile device and that users of mobile Facebook are twice as active on Facebook as those on computers.

When event participants share fundraising page links on social sites, it’s more likely than ever before that their potential sponsors may view that post or tweet through a mobile device. Our Fundraising with Facebook Whitepaper review of 645,000 individual donations in peer-driven events found that over 15% of those pledges were directly referred from Facebook.

Email is another platform driving donors to pledge by mobile web. Adobe’s 2013 Digital Publishing Report noted that 79% of smartphone owners use their device for reading email. In fact, that’s a higher percentage than those who use it for making phone calls!

We know that donors are motivated to give after reading personal emails from a friend or family member. When fundraising participants send emails to friends asking for donations, there’s a good chance their requests could be read on a smartphone or tablet.

It’s refreshing that the conversation about mobile technology in the non-profit sector has evolved beyond text-to-donate to include mobile design and apps as other important elements of an integrated fundraising campaign. Have these insights piqued your curiosity?

For more data about mobile fundraisers and mobile donations, please join our NTC session “Mobile Matters: The Impact of Mobile Technology on Peer-to-Peer Campaigns” on April 12 or download our Mobile Matters Whitepaper.

If you’re one of the 84% of people worldwide who claim they “couldn’t go a day” without a mobile phone in hand … You are not alone! We’ve never been more passionate users of mobile devices than we are right now.

At my company, Artez Interactive, we clearly can see the rising importance of smartphones and tablets by looking at the traffic to fundraising and donation pages on our North American platform. Of the millions of unique visitors to our system every month, over 15% are visiting on mobile devices.

As we increasingly adopt mobile devices in our professional and personal lives, we are also turning to mobile technology to help us support charitable causes.

At Artez, we wanted to know more about the impact of mobile devices on peer-to-peer, or “crowd-sourced,” fundraising campaigns. When individuals are motivated to ask their friends and social networks to donate to a cause, are those supporters using smartphones and tablets to help them fundraise? Similarly, are donors in peer-driven events giving through mobile-web enabled devices?

We examined the fundraising success of 83,566 participants in a variety of peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns to help answer that question for our Mobile Matters Whitepaper.

Some of the individuals in this study were participating in traditional run, walk, or cycle-a-thon events. Others were encouraged to host a party for a cause or raise pledges towards the completion of a challenging activity. All participants were asked to sign up on a charitable organization’s website and collect donations on a personal fundraising page towards their fundraising goal.

Registrants had the choice of any of the following digital fundraising tools to help them raise money:

  • Event Website: Participants on laptops and computers had the option to log into the campaign’s website to send solicitation emails, post on social media sites, upload photos and personal messages, and track donations through an online fundraising console.
  • Mobile Website: Participants on mobile devices automatically experienced a mobile-version of the campaign website, allowing them to log into the site and raise money through a mobile-optimized version of the fundraising console.
  • Mobile App: Participants with an Android or iOS device could download the event’s free mobile application (“app”) from Google Play or the iTunes store. The app allowed participants to log into a version of the campaign’s fundraising console, access their device’s contact list for email, post to social sites, and upload photos taken from their smartphones.

Given these options, we discovered that 23% of all participants chose to log into the mobile web site, download and log into the mobile app, or use both mobile options. (The highest percentage of “mobile fundraisers” we saw in any individual campaign was 37%.) That means that overall, almost one in four registrants used mobile tools to fundraise for their cause.

Mobile fundraisers and fundraising success

In each campaign we examined, mobile fundraisers raised more money than those who used the web only.

Participants who chose to use one mobile tool (mobile web or mobile app) raised 2.2 times more money than non-mobile participants. Individuals who used both mobile web and a mobile app were even more successful, raising 2.95 times more than non-mobile participants. These “heaviest mobile users” represented some of the most successful fundraisers in each campaign.

Do mobile fundraisers simply have wealthier friends? No!

Mobile fundraisers raised more individual pledges from friends and family than non-mobile fundraisers. The online-only group of participants averaged 5.1 individual donations. When participants used one mobile tool, either web or app, they earned an average 8.4 individual donations. Participants who used both mobile web and mobile apps earned even more, on average 11.4 individual donations.

Could mobile fundraisers be more successful at earning more pledges because they are making more asks for donations to friends and family members? When we surveyed participants to see which features of apps they were using the most, the most popular answer was: “make ‘asks’ for donations via email, Facebook and Twitter”.

Why are mobile fundraisers more successful at raising money?

It’s possible that mobile tools themselves help participants raise more money, encouraging them to check their messages and fundraising totals on-the-go, or make more individual requests for donations.

It’s also possible that a campaign’s most engaged, most enthusiastic, and best performing fundraisers are also big fans of smartphones and tablets. Most event fundraising professionals are well aware of the “80/20 Rule” proposing that, in general, 80% of donations will be generated by 20% of the most active participants.

Either scenario suggests it’s important for fundraising campaigns to provide mobile technology options for participants.

Donors and mobile devices

Participant success is only one piece of the mobile picture. Many people think of “mobile donations” as meaning gifts by text-to-donate (SMS), however, with the shift towards mobile web and responsive design, it’s now easier for donors on smartphones and tablets to give by credit card or PayPal directly through a charity’s mobile-optimized donation form.

With mobile traffic to charity and nonprofit pages hovering at 15%, we wondered about the donors in these peer-driven campaigns. Are donors giving on mobile devices?

When we dove into the pool of over 250,000 individual donations, we found that, yes, donors are making pledges on mobile web browsers. A little over 6.5% of the donations were made through a smartphone or tablet browser. To put this number in perspective, only 12 months ago the average number of mobile web donations in a campaign was 2.15%. That’s an incredible increase of 205% in the last year. (Which begs the question — what will the percentage of donations by mobile web browsers be by the end of 2013?)

What’s driving the rapid rise of mobile web donations?

The fact that almost 50% of Americans now own smartphones is just the beginning of the explanation. We also know that the majority of tweets are read on a mobile device and that users of mobile Facebook are twice as active on Facebook as those on computers.

When event participants share fundraising page links on social sites, it’s more likely than ever before that their potential sponsors may view that post or tweet through a mobile device. Our Fundraising with Facebook Whitepaper review of 645,000 individual donations in peer-driven events found that over 15% of those pledges were directly referred from Facebook.

Email is another platform driving donors to pledge by mobile web. Adobe’s 2013 Digital Publishing Report noted that 79% of smartphone owners use their device for reading email. In fact, that’s a higher percentage than those who use it for making phone calls!

We know that donors are motivated to give after reading personal emails from a friend or family member. When fundraising participants send emails to friends asking for donations, there’s a good chance their requests could be read on a smartphone or tablet.

It’s refreshing that the conversation about mobile technology in the non-profit sector has evolved beyond text-to-donate to include mobile design and apps as other important elements of an integrated fundraising campaign. Have these insights piqued your curiosity?

For more data about mobile fundraisers and mobile donations, please join our NTC session “Mobile Matters: The Impact of Mobile Technology on Peer-to-Peer Campaigns” on April 12 or download our Mobile Matters Whitepaper.