Tag: Leading Change Summit

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If you’ve looked over the agenda for the NTEN’s first-ever Leading Change Summit (#14LCS) this September, you’ve probably noticed that we tried to build in a healthy mix of time that attendees will spend in their tracks vs. time that will be spent all together.

All this summer we’ve been introducing you to the facilitators who will make the three tracks so memorable. Today I’m happy to introduce someone who will lead our first chunk of all-attendee, cross-track time on Wednesday, September 3: Lisa Heft.

heftlisa.jpgLisa is an internationally renowned facilitator and educator known for her use of Open Space Technology and other participant-driven dialogic and interactive methods for engaging deeper reflection, learning, and interchange. Her experience is across cultures and industries for diverse meeting objectives, knowledge-sharing conferences, dialogue-based task work, planning, and reflection. Lisa has been coaching our Education Manager, Julia, as we design this inaugural Summit, and she knows how important it is that the first all-conference gathering on Wednesday afternoon set a foundation for the rest of the event.

When you arrive at the San Francisco Hilton, you’ll pick up your registration badge and head directly into the session that Lisa is planning. She’s working closely with Wednesday’s keynote speaker, Deena Pierott, to make sure that this first opportunity for learning and sharing is inclusive, fun, thoughtful, and sets the stage for you to make the most of the rest of the Summit.

We’re excited that if you register for #14LCS, you’ll get to benefit from Lisa’s experience and wisdom, no matter which track you select! You can learn more about Lisa via her website, Opening Space.

View the lineup of #14LCS speakers and facilitators and register today!

 

 

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Over the past couple of months we’ve been introducing you to the incredible cast of characters who are helping to shape NTEN’s inaugural Leading Change Summit.

It’s about time we celebrate the dynamic duo behind the Idea Accelerator: Emily Lonigro Boylan and Demetrio Cardona-Maguigad of LimeRed Studio. LimeRed is a creative services firm that works with organizations that inspire positive change.

lonigroemily.limeredstudio.jpegcardona-madriguaddemetrio.jpgEmily, who founded LimeRed Studio ten years ago, has a portfolio spanning business development, design, user experience, writing, marketing, and strategy in both online and offline programs for multinational corporations, nonprofits, universities, boutique businesses, and prestigious consumer brands. She is a board member of MOM+BABY, member of Chicago’s Small Business Advocacy Council, contributor to The Net Change, and more.

Demetrio serves as LimeRed’s Director of Strategic Design. He is also an Assistant Professor and Researcher at Columbia College Chicago, where he teaches the Social Media & Public Relations Strategies courses in the Marketing Communications program, as well as an executive producer and on-air host for Chicago is the World, a weekly radio program with a global following.

Both Emily and Demetrio are committed members of NTEN and #nptech communities; you might recognize them from past talks at the Nonprofit Technology Conference, the 501 Tech Club Chicago meetup, or the Nonprofit Tech Academy faculty.

Learn more about Emily, Demetrio, and the Idea Accelerator:

We can’t wait to see what ideas surface between now and the Summit, and which finalists will take the mainstage at the end of the Idea Accelerator! Huge thanks to Emily and Demetrio for helping to shape and manage what’s sure to be an energizing and inspiring grand finale.

The Early Bird registration deadline for the 2014 Leading Change Summit has been extended to July 31st! Between now and July 31st, we’re offering the lowest rates to you, our amazing community members!  Join NTEN as we launch this Summit on September 3-6 in San Francisco.

If you haven’t registered yet, don’t miss out. And if you needed more convincing, here are the top 5 reasons why you should attend the Leading Change Summit this September! 

  1. The magic factor. When nonprofit leaders and changemakers get together in one room, big things can happen: Ideas, shared learning, partnerships – the opportunities are endless. But how can you tap the potential and move your ideas forward when it’s over? The LCS experience is all about the movement from start to finish, from the opening plenary until the Idea Accelerator. Learn more about the LCS experience. 
  2. Because it gets lonely at the top. You give 100% every day at work, but sometimes you just have to step back from the day-to-day tasks and think big. LCS offers an imaginative space for you to work with like-minded professionals to explore ideas, concepts, and projects to take forward once you leave. Check out the three educational tracks we have to offer: Impact LeadershipDigital Strategy, and Future of Technology.
  3. We’ve got your back. The discussions are defined by the people in the room, but you don’t have to wait until September 3rd to get started. Once you register and select a track, you can start networking with your track team through facilitated discussions online. We want you to maximize your time at LCS, so that’s why we’re hosting this free upcoming webinar on August 6th: How to Make the Most of the Leading Change Summit
  4. Our track facilitators & keynote speakers are truly remarkable. We’re fortunate to have some of the brightest professionals in the room that will be there to support and inspire you. Check out the full lineup of track facilitators and keynote speakers
  5. It ends with a bang. The Idea Accelerator (IA) is our super-charged finale to help you get a jump-start on putting your ideas into action. Led by facilitators from LimeRed Studio, Emily Lonigro Boylan and Demetrio Cardona-Maguigad, the IA will be looking for new ideas for programs, products, apps, websites, online community platforms, or hybrid organizations – with prizes in store for the winner! As an LCS attendee, you are encouraged to bring your idea to the forefront. Learn more about the Idea Accelerator and criteria to submit an idea. 

Who should attend? 

After years of convening our Nonprofit Technology Conference for a wide nonprofit audience, we created the Leading Change Summit to offer an exclusive opportunity for nonprofit changemakers to access advanced level learning amongst peers in the nonprofit industry. We’re looking for nonprofit changemakers that hold positions in (but not limited to): Executive Leadership, and Directors/Managers of Marketing & Communications, Fundraising, and IT. 

Register today! Visit the LCS website to register and view the agenda at-a-glance

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If you register for NTEN’s first-ever Leading Change Summit this September (#14LCS), you’ll be asked to choose one of three tracks—Digital Strategy, The Future of Technology, or Impact Leadership—and you’ll spend quite a bit of time with your track-mates at the Summit.

That’s why we’re doing our best to recruit a remarkable group of facilitators to help shape your experience. Each track will have two Lead Facilitators and several additional Facilitators who will design spaces and lead small group conversations to make sure that every participant has the chance to both learn and share.

campbellpeter.jpgToday we want to introduce you to one of them: Peter Campbell, a Facilitator for the Future of Technology track.

Peter Campbell is currently the Chief Information Officer at Legal Services Corporation, America’s partner for equal justice. Prior to serving at LSC, Peter spent five years as IT Director at Earthjustice, a non-profit law firm dedicated to defending the earth, and seven years serving as IT Director at Goodwill Industries of San Francisco, San Mateo & Marin Counties, Inc. Peter has been managing technology for non-profits and law firms for over 20 years and has a broad knowledge of systems, email, and the web. In 2003, he won a “Top Technology Innovator” award from InfoWorld for developing a retail reporting system for Goodwill thrift. Peter’s focus is on advancing communication, collaboration, and efficiency through creative use of the web and other technology platforms.

Learn about Peter’s thoughts about and excitement for the Future of Leadership track on his blog, Tech Cafeteria.

If you register for #14LCS and opt for this track, you’ll join Peter, Tracy Kronzak, and Tanya Tarr to share your ideas, receive direct feedback, and reflect deeply about your current work or the plans you and your team hope to tackle.

You can follow Peter on Twitter at @peterscampbell.

And check out the full lineup of #14LCS speakers and facilitators!

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This September 3-6, NTEN will debut the Leading Change Summit. In addition to the conversations with participants in three separate tracks, #14LCS includes a stellar lineup of keynote speakers who will spark new conversations and nudge existing conversations to introduce new questions.

deena-pierott.preview.jpgToday we’re excited to share that Deena Pierott, founder of the White House honored youth program called iUrban Teen Tech, will offer a keynote called Moving from Diversity to Inclusion: Changing landscapes of nonprofit technology.

iUrban Teen Tech has an intentional outreach to male youth of color and exposes them to STEM+Arts career opportunities. Deena believes in digital equity and inclusion and ways tech can drive economic development in more marginalized communities. She is also the founder of Mosaic Blueprint, a Pacific NW firm specializing in diversity consulting, nonprofit diversity recruiting, and multicultural branding. She recently created the Portland Metro Diversity Employment Network, which consists of Portland Metro Human Resource Managers and Corporate Recruiters who are creating a whole new model for diversity recruiting and on-boarding.

She has been featured in the following publications: Essence Magazine, Black Enterprise, Ebony Magazine, Deliver magazine, Neurology Now, the Chicago Tribune, NPR, and Working Mother Magazine.

You can follow Deena Pierott at @deenapierott.

And check out the full lineup of #14LCS speakers and facilitators!

banner_final.preview.jpg

If you register for NTEN’s first-ever Leading Change Summit this September (#14LCS), you’ll be asked to choose one of three tracks—Digital Strategy, The Future of Technology, or Impact Leadership—and you’ll spend quite a bit of time with your track-mates at the Summit.

That’s why we’re doing our best to recruit a remarkable group of facilitators to help shape your experience. Each track will have two Lead Facilitators and several additional Facilitators who will design spaces and lead small group conversations to make sure that every participant has the chance to both learn and share.

londelljackson.jpgToday we want to introduce you to one of them: Londell Jackson, a Facilitator for the Impact Leadership track.

As Director of Education and Programs with the Colorado Nonprofit Association, Londell Jackson serves as an adult educator and nonprofit administrator. As a professional of the Third Sector, he is active in this community through his work locally, statewide, and nationally. Londell has helped to further the work of Denver’s workforce development professionals, Colorado’s statewide nonprofit sector, the national LGBT movement, and the field of financial education. Currently, he is focusing his talents on the education of adult students both in study and practice.

If you register for #14LCS and opt for this track, you’ll join Londell, Elissa Perry, Beth Kanter, and John Kenyon to share your ideas, receive direct feedback, and reflect deeply about your current work or the plans you and your team hope to tackle.

You can follow Londell on Twitter at @LondellJackson.

And check out the full lineup of #14LCS speakers and facilitators!

banner_final.preview.jpg

If you register for NTEN’s first-ever Leading Change Summit this September (#14LCS), you’ll be asked to choose one of three tracks—Digital Strategy, The Future of Technology, or Impact Leadership—and you’ll spend quite a bit of time with your track-mates at the Summit.

That’s why we’re doing our best to recruit a remarkable group of facilitators to help shape your experience. Each track will have two Lead Facilitators and several additional Facilitators who will design spaces and lead small group conversations to make sure that every participant has the chance to both learn and share.

egsp_cropped.gifToday we want to introduce you to one of them: Elissa Perry, a Facilitator for the Impact Leadership track.

Elissa Perry is Program Catalyst for the Network Leadership Innovation Lab, a project os Management Assistance Group. She helps people and groups of people with a social justice mission get better at what they do. For over 20 years, she has worked as a staff member, board member, consultant, and coach with several individuals, organizations, and initiatives in the areas of leadership, youth development, and the arts.

Elissa also teaches in the Masters in Leadership Programs at Saint Mary’s College where she facilitates diverse, cross-sector, and multi-issue learning communities in developing and implementing leadership plans and practices and recently helped establish a Social Justice Concentration.

If you register for #14LCS and opt for this track, you’ll join Elissa, Londell Jackson, Beth Kanter, and John Kenyon to share your ideas, receive direct feedback, and reflect deeply about your current work or the plans you and your team hope to tackle.

You can follow Management Assistance Group on Twitter at @mgmtassistance.

And check out the full lineup of #14LCS speakers and facilitators!

banner_final.preview.jpg

If you register for NTEN’s first-ever Leading Change Summit this September (#14LCS), you’ll be asked to choose one of three tracks—Digital Strategy, The Future of Technology, or Impact Leadership—and you’ll spend quite a bit of time with your track-mates at the Summit.

That’s why we’re doing our best to recruit a remarkable group of facilitators to help shape your experience. Each track will have two Lead Facilitators and several additional Facilitators who will design spaces and lead small group conversations to make sure that every participant has the chance to both learn and share.

kunapuli_deepa.jpgToday we want to introduce you to one of them: Deepa Kunapuli, a Lead Facilitator for the Digital Strategy track.

Deepa Kunapuli is a digital strategist, writer, and entrepreneur. She is a co-founder of The Brain Trust, a digital consulting firm that provides capacity building services to Asian American and Pacific Islander organizations in the social justice and advocacy space.

Previously, she ran online programs for the New Organizing Institute, trained thousands of progressive organizers in digital best practices, and ran online constituency outreach for the 2012 Obama campaign. She’s a proud graduate of the University of Iowa and spends her free time at dance class.

If you register for #14LCS and opt for this track, you’ll join Deepa, Bridget Marie Todd, and their crackerjack team of facilitators to reflect deeply about how nonprofits can drive Web innovation and how to make the Web work for us.

You can follow Deepa on Twitter at @Deepa_K.

And check out the full lineup of #14LCS speakers and facilitators!

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This September 3-6, NTEN will debut the Leading Change Summit. In addition to the conversations with participants in three separate tracks, #14LCS includes a stellar lineup of keynote speakers who will spark new conversations and nudge existing conversations to introduce new questions.

mattgrochheadshot.jpgToday we’re excited to share that Matt Groch, Director of Solution Delivery at Mission Measurement, will offer a keynote called Moneyball for Social Impact, Or how I learned to stop worrying and embrace the implications of a discrete closed-loop factor analysis framework for social impact. How do we measure social change? Matt will show us how.

As Director of Solution Delivery, Matt is responsible for defining and curating Mission Measurement’s suite of products and services. Matt is a research and information technology executive with key competencies in measurement and analytics, business process engineering and optimization, product development, and organizational management.

Prior to joining Mission Measurement, Matt served as Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President at Edelman Berland (formally StrategyOne) where he led the firm’s social media analytics practice and associated product development initiatives. Matt has served in roles focused on the strategic application of technology across a broad spectrum of industries, including healthcare, telecommunications, high-speed discrete manufacturing, and capital markets. In addition, Matt co-founded and served as Director of Technology for 2MC, a Chicago-based internet consulting firm. Matt is the recipient of the 2011 Edelman Chicago “Eddy” Award for Innovation.

To get a jump-start on conversations for LCS, we asked Matt a few questions, shared below.

Do you have any tips for keeping some perspective amidst all these numbers between actions, tactics, and social impact?

First off, in terms of metrics, you need to be very clear in your own mind as to what the exact intended end use of that data will be. Collecting data simply for the sake of collecting data can be expensive—particularly if you think of it from the perspective of the opportunity cost to providing more services to your organization’s beneficiaries. An oft-recommended general best practice is to start with an idea of the set of specific decisions you want to be able to make using data and then work your way backward from there to determine the metrics needed to produce that data.

Ultimately, however, it all comes down to social impact—and in that sense, you want to focus the lion’s share of your metrics-gathering efforts on the tangible social outcomes you are trying to produce. I think there are two key points to keep in mind here.

First, “size” your outcomes appropriately: be realistic and honest with yourself about what impact your organization is really in a position to affect and demarcate your outcomes accordingly; if your organization delivers after-school tutoring to local area 5th graders, you’re probably moving the needle more on increasing literacy rates for those children than improving college completion rates at the national level.

Second, align your measurement efforts to your outcomes as much as possible; ideally, measure the outcomes directly, and when direct measurements aren’t possible due to practical reasons (e.g., time, cost), leverage the evidence-based social science research available to identify the strongest leading indicators and capture metrics on those.

Can you offer any advice for finding, gathering, or sourcing good data to inform their strategies?

A lot of social science research has already been done, so don’t start from scratch if you don’t need to. Resources like the What Works Clearinghouse, the Promising Practices Network, et al are probably good places to start.

How do you think technology will change the way we make social change in 10 years?

I think we are quickly approaching an inflection point for how technology will affect our capacity for social impact. By virtue of the work we’re doing at Mission Measurement, I believe that in ten years’ time, we will be leveraging technology for massive increases in efficiency in terms of how resources are allocated across the social sector. Today, resources for social impact are allocated randomly for the most part. But imagine ten years from now, where the infrastructure for social finance is built out to support a literal social impact market, where “buyers” of social impact (e.g., governments, foundations) can put out an “ask” for a specific outcome (e.g. increase access to college education for disadvantage inner city populations) and “sellers” of social impact (e.g., nonprofits and other service providers) can then bid on the opportunity using standard metrics that transparently articulate their cost per unit of “impact.”

Upon registration, #14LCS participants choose one of three tracks—Digital Strategy, The Future of Technology, or Impact Leadership—and spend a good deal of time in track-specific sessions. That’s one reason we’re looking forward to Matt’s talk: along with two other keynotes and some meals and receptions, this will be an opportunity for all participants to be together and discuss some of the critical issues affecting their abilities to use technology to create social change.

Learn what Matt Groch and his team are working on at @MissionMeasure.

And check out the full lineup of #14LCS speakers and facilitators!

banner_final.preview.jpg

If you register for NTEN’s first-ever Leading Change Summit this September (#14LCS), you’ll be asked to choose one of three tracks—Digital Strategy, The Future of Technology, or Impact Leadership—and you’ll spend quite a bit of time with your track-mates at the Summit.

That’s why we’re doing our best to recruit a remarkable group of facilitators to help shape your experience. Each track will have two Lead Facilitators and several additional Facilitators who will design spaces and lead small group conversations to make sure that every participant has the chance to both learn and share.

tanya-tarr-headshot.jpgToday we want to introduce you to one of them: Tanya Tarr, a Lead Facilitator for The Future of Technology track. Tanya is Director of Legislative & Political Mobilization at Texas American Federation of Teachers. She has also worked as a political analyst and a data manager and is a veteran of local, state, and federal electoral campaigns. In 2009, Tanya received a Rising Star award from Campaigns and Elections’ Politics Magazine, recognizing people under 35 years old who have made a significant mark in political consulting or advocacy.

In our conversations with Tanya, it has been clear that she is not only committed to creating spaces for inclusive and productive conversations, but also to sparking a sense of joy and optimism at the Summit.

If you register for #14LCS and opt for this track, you’ll join Tanya, Tracy Kronzak, and their crackerjack team of facilitators to reflect deeply about how the future of technology will impact your organizational focus and hiring, staffing, and community engagement plans, as well as how it will change the way you think of innovation, solution-finding, and change management.

You can follow Tanya on Twitter at @nerdette.

And check out the full lineup of #14LCS speakers and facilitators!