December 31, 2014

The Impact of Your Donation: Johanna Cricenti, 14LCS Scholarship Recipient, Shares

Last year, NTEN Community Champions helped to raise over $36,000 to support the NTEN Community Challenge, which enhanced NTEN’s program accessibility, including sending over 50 people to the 2014 Nonprofit Technology Conference (14NTC) and the 2014 Leading Change Summit (14LCS) with scholarships.

To whom did the scholarships go, and what was the impact of your donation? As we raise support for 2015, we wanted to share the impact of your donation from last year, from the voices of our scholarship recipients. Today, we want to introduce you to Johanna Cricenti, Program Coordinator of InnovATE (Innovation for Agricultural Training and Education), a USAID-funded project led by the Virginia Tech University Office of International Research Education and Development.

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What is your organization’s mission?

The mission of the Innovation for Agricultural Training and Education (innovATE) Project is to cultivate the human and institutional capacity necessary for developing countries to promote rural innovation needed to achieve sustainable food security, reduce poverty, conserve natural resources, and address other rural problems. This capacity will rely largely on in-country agricultural education and training programs and institutions to be cost-effective, sustainable, and relevant.

Can you describe your experience at the 14LCS?

I had not considered digital strategies for our work until having the opportunity to attend the LCS. Technology sometimes is an afterthought in program management, and there is little exposure and training on how to best use much of the new solutions out there. Having the chance to step back and see what other organizations are doing has helped to reinvigorate our approach to communicating our mission and vision to our stakeholders and participants. Read my post for more on the lessons learned.

Can you give an example of how you applied what you learned from the 14LCS to your daily work?

We have developed an online community for AET professionals, and the summit sessions and networking opportunities were very helpful for us to think about using our tech tools to better recruit and engage our members.

Why should people donate to the 2015 NTEN Community Challenge to support opportunities such as NTC/LCS scholarships?

New tech solutions are always emerging, and there needs to be more discussion and training for programs in the nonprofit sector to utilize and create partnerships with the private sector as well as donors. NTEN bridges the gap for our organizations and serves in training and delivery of tools and strategies that are not always budgeted for in programs.

Special thanks to Johanna for putting tech to work for social change at her nonprofit, and huge thanks to all who helped make her experience at the 14LCS possible! Read more stories from 2014 scholarship recipients about the impact of your donation. 

This season, we’re trying to raise $50,000  through the 2015 NTEN Community Challenge to give more people like Johanna access to NTEN’s activities and initiatives that advance nonprofit technology. Support NTEN’s Community Champions and Board Members today by donating directly to their fundraising pages on the NTEN Community Challenge campaign on Crowdrise.  

Steph Routh
Steph is Content Manager at NTEN: The Nonprofit Technology Network. She has spent over a decade in the nonprofit sector, with a focus on organizational development, communications, fundraising, and program planning. Steph served as the first Executive Director of Oregon Walks for five years prior to joining NTEN. She is passionate about removing barriers to opportunities and finding equity at the many intersections of social justice work. And she feels lucky every day she is at NTEN, with a Community that does exactly that. Outside the NTEN office, Steph is the Mayor of Hopscotch Town, a consulting and small publishing firm that inspires and celebrates fun, lovable places for everyone. Steph is married to her bicycle and an aunt of two.