Multiple Platform Social Media Strategies: Recap from #StateandMain14

Last week I got to attend the National Alliance for Media and Culture (NAMAC) and Alliance for Community Media (ACM)‘s first-ever joint National Conference: State and Main 2014 (#StateMain14) in Philadelphia, PA. The beautiful murals you’ll find throughout the streets of Philadelphia provided a perfect backdrop for this gathering of nonprofit arts professionals.

I took part in the panel: Multiple Platform Social Media Strategies, which explored ways nonprofits can use social media more effectively, and sought to answer the proverbial question: “If a tree falls in the social media forest, how can you make sure anyone hears it?”

NTEN Member and Social Media Strategist, Lyndal Cairns, moderated the panel, and helped put together this blog post. In addition, we were joined by fellow panelists, Felicia Pride, pride collaborative, and Nickey Robare, St. Paul Neighborhood Network.

Each panelist explained how they used social media to further their mission and then shared their experience with finding and telling their organizations’ stories, goal-setting, and developing strategies for engagement. We explained the differences between networks and the communities that reside there, how to develop your organizations’ “voice,” and how to turn social media interest into ticket sales and donations.

The best part was the input we received from attendees about tools to help social media managers get organized and develop content without straying from their mission. Some of the tools highlighted include:

Content curation

  • Feedly: a news aggregation app that pulls feeds from news sites and social media.
  • Evernote: a note-taking app and program that helps you “remember” and categorize links and notes.
  • FlipBoard: a content curator that brings you content based on your interests with a newspaper look and feel.
  • Storify: a content curation tool that allows you to create a timeline of social media posts, video, slide decks, and other online media.
  • NTEN Member, Beth Kanter, has a primer on content curation that’s a useful guide for getting started.

Community engagement

  • Attentive.ly: a social relationship manager, which links with a constituent relationship manager (CRM) to track and target messages to social media “champions” and prospective donors.
  • Sprout Social: a social media management software that gives high-end monitoring and reporting services, as well as incorporating some CRM features so managers can identify and write notes on social media engagers and assign project management tasks.
  • Mobile Commons: a platform that helps nonprofits reach their communities through text message.
  • If This, Then That: a task management tool to automate program processes like sending social media posts, creating lists, and staying on top of tasks.

Policies

And it wouldn’t be a social media panel without social media from the social media panel (how very meta)! Check out the Storify from Lyndal highlighting the social posts from our session.

Do you have tools to recommend? Add them to this list by posting in the comments!

Also, if you’re a NAMAC or AMC member, don’t forget to take advantage of your NTEN benefits! Learn more on the NAMAC or ACM partner page.

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